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Culinary Creativity at Local Cape Cod Farms

With every item and ingredient ever-so accessible in long, overstretched grocery store aisles, sometimes I feel as if my culinary creativity is slipping from my grasp. With every option and possibility at my fingertips, I find myself falling into the same patterns, looking at the same shopping list, and never forced to think critically or creatively to innovate.

We all fall victim to shrinking to what we are comfortable with—the same meals, the same clear-cut path through Trader Joe’s including exactly 7 turns, and 11 stops. However, have you ever sighed in mourning of the creativity you may have lost over the years? Do you desire the encouragement to still be as creative as you were at a worn-out desk in an elementary school classroom? I do. 

“Adulting” in some shape or form typically means cooking for ourselves, even if it is just a box of pasta or a half-salvageable burnt piece of toast. Although, I’ve decided that to repossess all the natural and childlike creativity we have to share with this world, it can be brought to us again in the kitchen. We don’t all have time to squeeze finger painting into our busy, “matured,” schedules, but we always manage to have time to eat. 

I find that coordinating cuisine and creativity is the perfect complement—synchronously nurturing our minds and, of course, our stomachs. But, nonetheless, being creative is not an easy feat when the automatic door slides open and everything and anything can be found and rung up by a cashier. 

I often see myself in this compromising position, where the freedom to choose what I want inversely inhibits my mind’s capacity to create. However, living in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, I have discovered the abundance of small family-owned farms and markets to be the perfect solution. Trailing through a supermarket does not do our creative instincts any justice, yet local farmer stands, with little on display and sometimes just a basket of mix-matched produce placed in your hands, functions as the best creative exercise. 

This creativity routine seems to find me like an inkblot. If you’re familiar with the inkblot practice, it is where you are given a just splotch of ink on paper and urged to draw something from its organic and unique form. The produce at local farms display a similar test. They provide an exercise to work our creativity muscles as we encounter the unpredictable. 

The local, in-season, and fresh produce change rapidly. Every trip to the farm stand feels like a brand-new canvas that invites me to use different colors and techniques. This is why spotting a farm stand lays witness to a beautiful sort of spontaneity. I typically have no idea that it is just down the street, and then one day, I stare at the sign a short second longer, pull into the drive, and here I meet my creative match in a basket of watercress greens. 

I take what is given, yet limited, and create a meal. There’s no overthinking, just the transformation of produce to product. It is nearly an unconscious exercise to measure my creative potential. In this process, I feel more attachment to my food, as I can personally testify to its transition from farm to table. In this repeated experience, I have found that it is ever-so important to re-attach ourselves to the process. Yes, a meal can be bought and prepared with ease and efficiency today. Yet, there is a symbiotic relationship between investing in local farms and investing in ourselves. When we leave the grocery list and meal-prep ideas behind, we can allow ourselves to discover new greens, fruits, and more. We can present ourselves simultaneously with a challenge and magnificent experience to reignite our inventive side. 

I urge everyone to forget the overpriced tabs and many mediocre meals gone bye. Rather, take on the distinctive creativity-inducing experience that is delivered through local farms and home cooking this summer season.

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Mucho Gusto

Blueberry Brie Grilled Cheese

Writing this recipe, I imagine myself sitting in the conference room of Runway Magazine; well-acquainted with the infamous fictional character Miranda Priestly. I see her furrowed brow, I shiver from her glaring eyes, and I hear her cold tone as she sarcastically remarks, “Fruit? For Spring? Groundbreaking.” 

Fruit, like florals, evoke this exaggerated eye-roll in the name of an outdone, over-used, and repeated theme when introduced as the statement piece in a Spring dish. They are the equivalent of florals of a spring clothing line—severely lacking the element of surprise. How many times have fruit, specifically berries, been the cover of food magazines this time of year? Probably far too often. Yet, despite my hesitation to choose this recipe in an often dire need to move away from the status quo, I pick this blueberry-based dish because it is, in fact, groundbreaking.  

This recipe presents a new take on a classic comfort food, exquisitely repurposing blueberries in an unpredictable combination. Pairing the bitter flavor of arugula with the creamy texture of brie and the salty-sweet trade of honey and balsamic vinaigrette, the homemade blueberry compote perfectly enhances every bite of this sandwich, creating a redefined grilled cheese. 

Posing as strong contender to the pineapple-on-pizza debate, this salty-sweet pairing may open the floodgates to controversy. However, the buttery brie, and the sweet, fresh berries, in this grilled cheese guarantee to win over any skeptics. And while this recipe may stretch the traditional, and simplistic, definitions of a grilled cheese, it proves to enhance the glory of the original sandwich to make it a Spring must-try.

Image courtesy of Two Peas & Their Pod

Ingredients:

2 cups blueberries

4 tablespoons (or more) unsalted butter, room temperature

8 slices sourdough bread, 1/2 inch thick

1 wheel brie cheese

2 tablespoons honey

Kosher salt to taste

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 cups arugula 

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Instructions:

Place the blueberries into a saucepan over medium heat with 1 tablespoon of butter. Mash the blueberries softly and let them cook for about 5 minutes while stirring frequently. Move the pan off the stove and let the blueberries sit until they are ready to be used.

Cut the sourdough into 8 half-inch slices and lightly butter both sides of each slice. Cut the brie cheese into quarter-inch slices with or without the rind, depending on your preference. Place 4-5 slices of brie on each of 4 slices of sourdough. Drizzle the brie with honey and sprinkle salt to taste. Spoon the cooked blueberries on top of the brie. 

Now, move onto the remaining 4 slices of sourdough. Lightly coat one side of each piece with balsamic vinaigrette, and then place a handful of arugula on top. When ready, flip these slices on top of the other slices prepared with brie and blueberries, making 4 closed sandwiches.

Next, heat 1 tablespoon of butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Place 1 or 2 sandwiches in the skillet, depending on what fits comfortably. Lay another skillet on top to add weight, functioning like a panini press. Cook for about 4 minutes, while adding pressure on the top skillet so that the bottom of each sandwich turns golden brown. Turn the sandwiches over, adding a bit more butter to the pan if needed. Cover again and cook, pressing, until the other side is golden brown and cheese is fully melted. This should take about 4 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and cut into halves. Repeat with the remaining sandwiches and enjoy!

Makes 4 sandwiches. 

Cover photo courtesy of Two Peas & Their Pod

Categories
Mucho Gusto

Spring’s Spicy-Sweet Potato Crisps

In my habitual attempt to advance a controversial opinion, I have decided what I want my new statement-piece penny thought to be: if spring had a flavor, it would be sweet and spicy. 

My nonconformist calculation derives itself distinctly from one, and only one, piece of evidence—the New England weather.

Is the season sweet with the sun emerging in and the winter parka disappearing in the back corner of your closet? Or, conversely, is it the “spiciest” few months in the Northeast with forecasts far more unpredictable than reliable? I assure you, it’s a bit of both. There is a simultaneous beauty and nearly worrisome spontaneity to spring, yet the season harmonizes the uncertainty and brings us months that we must savor. 

With a taste of spring on our tongues in the first week of April, this maple chili sweet potato crisp recipe proves the unmatched matrimony of sweet and spicy, and demands us to relish in the flavorful spirit of the season. This dish fits as the perfect complement to spring greens or that first piece of chicken cooked out on the grill. As it is surely time to let go of the chunky, dense sweet potato bites that remind you of that old winter sweater, these thinly-sliced sweet potato crisps will give you that crunch to prelude a summer plate of fish and chips – while, of course, adding some of the heat we are so desperate to see on the forecast. 

You’ll find that the flavors mutually amplify one another in every bite. It is the gift of their pairing, with nothing else quite able to compare. It is a perfect balance that appears contradictory, yet guarantees to intrigue one’s taste buds in every bite.

Ingredients:

2 large sweet potatoes

1 tablespoon chili flakes

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons maple syrup

2 teaspoons fresh rosemary leaves minced

1 teaspoon honey

Salt and pepper to taste

Procedure:

Preheat your oven to 425 °F. Then, prepare the sweet potatoes. First, slice them in half lengthwise. Placing them on their flat side, slice the potatoes thinly, just under a quarter-inch to guarantee a crispy product. Next, soak your potatoes in a mixing bowl filled with cold water and a few ice cubes for 10-15 minutes. The cold water is a quick and easy trick to help your potatoes cook more evenly. After this, drain the water and pat the slices dry. Transfer your potatoes into another mixing bowl and add olive oil, maple syrup, chili flakes, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss the potatoes well to evenly coat them in the spicy syrup mixture. Then lay the potatoes out on a baking sheet and drizzle with honey and fresh minced rosemary leaves. Once the oven is preheated, place in the oven for 20-25 minutes or until desired crispy texture. Be sure to turn over the potatoes roughly halfway through to ensure they are evenly cooked. Once finished, top your sweet and spicy potatoes on a summer salad or include them as a side to any meal. Enjoy!

Cover photo courtesy of Delicious Meets Healthy

Categories
Mucho Gusto

Chicken Shawarma

From the aesthetically-pleasing whipped coffee, to the new-and-improved tortilla fold, and the infamous baked feta pasta, TikTok is leaving its mark on culinary pop culture. Since we’ve been swapping old-school cookbooks for social media and using scrolling as the new way to savor, I’ve pulled a page from TikTok’s book, taking inspiration from its new obsession with feta cheese for this recipe. 

Feta cheese combines a sharp flavor with a softer texture. While typically produced and purchased in a firm block, feta crumbles easily to make the perfect topping for many Mediterranean dishes. The cheese originates from Greece and continues to be a highly-consumed and produced good in the region. Its salty taste balances more mild dishes and ingredients, such as vegetables. Its use as a garnish never fails to make your meal look top-dollar even with limited prep time. 

After visiting GreCo, a casual Greek restaurant on Newbury Street in Boston, I decided to intertwine my desire to indulge continually in Greek-inspired food and my wish to tackle the feta trend in one recipe. 

Here, I present an easy and undeniably tasty meal wrapped up in my favorite thing: bread. In this dish, warm pita pockets hold shawarma chicken, Mediterranean salad, tzatziki sauce, and—of course—feta cheese. Shawarma is the cooking term used to describe how the meat is stacked on a spit and slowly roasted in a traditional Middle Eastern kitchen. However, this recipe allows for the simpler approach of preparing the chicken on a stove. While not perfectly authentic to the Greek preparation, this meal guarantees to replicate many of the wonderful spicy flavors with ease for anyone new to the kitchen. And not to forget, the feta’s tangy flavor promises to complement the abundance of robust spices, while the creamy tzatziki sauce further mellows the dish. 

Ingredients:

Shawarma Chicken:

2 pounds boneless chicken breast

1 tablespoon olive oil

Juice from 1/2 lemon

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons sea salt

1 teaspoon cumin

1 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Mediterranean Chopped Salsa:

1 cucumber, peeled and chopped

1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved

1 medium red pepper, chopped

1 small sweet onion, chopped

10-15 Queen stuffed green olives, sliced

1/4 cup feta cheese, crumbled

Olive oil to coat

Salt and pepper to taste

Tzatziki Sauce:

1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt

1/2 cup sour cream

2 tablespoons tzatziki spice (can be bought pre-made or made at home with the combination of 2 tablespoons of dill, 4 cloves of minced garlic, and salt and pepper to taste)

4-6 pita pockets

Procedure:

First, cut the boneless chicken breast into thin strips. The strips should be roughly a finger-length long to make for an easy fit into the pita pockets. Next, in a large bowl, combine the chicken, lemon, oil, and spices. Toss the chicken well to be sure it is coated evenly in the mixture. Allow the meat to marinate while you prepare the salad and sauce. 

In a large bowl, combine all the chopped salad ingredients. Add just enough olive oil to coat the vegetables, then season with salt and pepper to taste. In a small bowl, whisk the yogurt and sour cream, then season with tzatziki spice. 

To cook the chicken, heat a cast-iron skillet until hot. To test if it’s ready, drop a bit of water on it; if the water sizzles, the pan is hot enough. Add a little oil and then some of the chicken to the skillet. It’s important not to overcrowd the pan. Allow the pieces to brown for 1 to 2 minutes before turning them. Because the pieces are thin, they will cook in only 4 to 5 minutes. When the chicken slices are done, transfer them to a bowl to keep warm while you finish cooking the rest of the chicken. 

Next, halve your whole pita breads to create open pockets that can deliciously and effectively carry the chicken and Mediterranean salad. Once halved, lightly warm the pita pockets in a skillet. Place the chicken in the opening of the halved pita pockets with the salad and tzatziki sauce. Garnish the top of your open pita pockets with crumbled feta cheese, serve, and enjoy!

Cover photo courtesy of Blue Jean Chef

Categories
Mucho Gusto

Lilly’s Holiday Honey-Roasted Pear Salad

This is the fifty-eighth installment in Mucho Gusto, a recipe initiative by and for students to help connect us through food in times of isolation. If you’ve got a recipe you think would make a great addition, reach out to us!

The word “pear” occasionally slips past our tongues in December when we hum the infamous Twelve Days of Christmas refrain, imagining the gifted partridge in company. Yet other than in tune, pears rarely draw near our taste buds in the modern holiday season. Perhaps it is a consequence of the winter fruit paradox—the nudge of fruit to the periphery of our minds as the North begins to frost over. However, despite our neglect of pears, they are the national fruit of December, with the day of the pear fast-approaching on the 8th. 

Dating back to 5000 B.C., the antiquity of pears remembers praise by Homer as the “gift of the Gods.” Now, the historically-popular fruit rarely appears in anecdotes of public appreciation despite the prolific pear orchards in the temperate North West, United States. As agricultural production expanded in the U.S., finicky pears failed to grow in the New England climate, only later to find success in their cultivation in Oregon and Washington. Although, posing pears to their opposition—apples—indicates that their dissipation from popularity is, more so, a reflection of our demanding consumer culture. Pears require an additional one to two months after being picked to ripen before being eaten. Compared to the readily available apples that overwhelm the produce aisles this time of year, the pears’ lack of casting in leading roles in pies and other seasonal dishes is somewhat predictable.

However, though we may overlook pears today, they continue being a Christmas favorite. Since the 1800s, pears have been a treasured part of Christmas celebrations, admired for their elegance, versatility, buttery texture, and sweet taste as an adored present under the tree. Though we have shifted away from receiving and gifting fruit in stockings, the nostalgia of pears in the holiday season evokes a personal desire to recreate some recipe favorites that adorn this winter fruit as the centerpiece. Several pie recipes and other dessert dishes utilize the flavor of pears to perfection. However, I decided to showcase a recipe for a honey-roasted pear salad. This dish fosters sentimentality coupled with modern festivity that guarantees to please our quarantine-sized crowds for this holiday season. 

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

Honey Roasted Pears

  • 2 ripe but firm Bartlett pears
  • 2 bunches fresh thyme
  • ¼ cup  honey
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Salad

  • 1 medium-sized bag (about 7 oz) of arugula 
  • ¼ cup toasted walnuts
  • ½ cup of crumbled goat cheese
  • 1 pomegranate

Dressing

  • ¼ cup champagne vinegar
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 shallot finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon  fresh thyme leaves

Instructions:

To prepare the pears, first, preheat the oven to 400 °F. On a cutting board, halve and core the two unpeeled pears. Then, place the pears cut-side down and put your knife at their stems. While keeping the pear uncut at the top, thinly slice into quarter-inch long sections to the bottom of the fruit. On a baking sheet, scatter the thyme sprigs, placing the pears on top while gently expanding the overlapping slices out while they remain attached at their stems. This fanning technique takes its name from its comparative structure to old-fashioned hand fans, seemingly adding an elegant display to your salad. However, you can easily replace this step by completely slicing the pears and removing their stems with no effect on the fruit’s rich flavor. Next, lightly drizzle the four pear halves with honey and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Bake the pears for 15 minutes, or until they are tender. Let the pears cool for 30 minutes.

The walnuts function as an additional garnish to your salad, complementing the flavor of the pears while simultaneously preserving the holiday theme. Place the walnuts in a skillet over medium heat, sporadically moving them around to avoid burning, and toast until lightly brown and aromatic. Allow the walnuts to cool in a small bowl. 

With your palm, roll the pomegranate on the cutting board to loosen the seeds. Then, slice the fruit in half, remove the seeds, and set aside. The pomegranate seeds, a bit tart, balance the sweetness of the pear and honey while brightening your salad with a festive touch of red.

To make the dressing, whisk the champagne vinegar, extra virgin olive oil, shallots, and fresh thyme together in a small mixing bowl. Place the arugula in a large bowl and add the dressing. Be sure to toss and coat evenly. 

Finally, divide salad onto plates, placing the pear halves on top while garnishing lightly with goat cheese, toasted walnuts, and pomegranate seeds to taste. Enjoy!

Categories
Mucho Gusto

Anju’s Chocolate Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies

This is the fifty-fourth installment in Mucho Gusto, a recipe initiative by and for students to help connect us through food in times of isolation. If you’ve got a recipe you think would make a great addition, reach out to us!

The tragic story of the cookie platter: the chocolate chip and the traditional sugar cookies are immediately devoured as the oatmeal lies at the periphery of our vision. Ultimately, the narrative is scripted with the sentiment that oatmeal cookies are an old crowd-pleaser that no longer carry the same adoration. When’s the last time you’ve heard someone at a dinner party say, “Finally, it’s time to bring out the oatmeal cookies”? 

So, speaking of oats, they’re easily accessible and heart-healthy, but are they also terribly out of date? Archaeologists propose that oats were cultivated around 4000 years ago, so it simply could be their time to dissipate from the culinary currents. However, a rejuvenation of oats appears to be far more likely to occur, illuminating that “vintage” can be appreciated once again.

If you subscribe to the food trends, you’ve seen coffee creamer be upgraded to oat milk, and traditional oatmeal finding itself revamped in the form of overnight oats. With the versatility of oats re-emerging in the spotlight as more than a forgotten, gooey breakfast meal, it raises the question, “When will be the time for the oatmeal cookie recipe to be refurbished?” Will the contemporary oat movement come to a halt for the cookie, or will the recipe be patched and reintroduced, becoming the new go-to when you have oats in the kitchen cabinet?

As my friend Anju gave to me, I am passing on this chocolate-cranberry oatmeal cookie recipe that promises to have oatmeal cookies competing for your indulgence. These oatmeal cookies will not be placed in Tupperware or forgotten as leftovers, but rather, will be the first picked off the plate. Of course, the cranberries can be substituted with raisins if you’d prefer to follow the more traditional oatmeal cookie route. However, the cranberries effectively capture the autumnal design that begs to be baked and enjoyed as Thanksgiving springs around the corner. This recipe will unapologetically take away from your supply of breakfast oats in a strategic turn for a delectable dessert. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon hot water
  • 12 ounces chocolate chips
  • ½ – 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 375℉. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, and salt. In a larger bowl, cut the butter into 1-inch cubes and lightly warm in the microwave or, preferably, remove the butter from the refrigerator, allowing it to soften for 10 minutes at room temperature. If you choose to microwave the butter, be careful not to heat it for too long; you are looking for a soft but not melted consistency. Next, cream the butter with an electric mixer on its lowest speed setting or whisk by hand until you see the fluffy texture that is desired. Add in the granulated and brown sugar, eggs, and water, one at a time while stirring between additions. Be sure to mix the ingredients together thoroughly before bringing in the next steps. Then, add the ingredients left in your medium-sized bowl — the flour, baking soda, and salt —  to the rest of your prepared ingredients in the large bowl. Fold in the oats, chocolate chips, cranberries, and vanilla extract. The thick rolled oat flakes in adjacency to the chewy cranberries compete for delicious taste and texture in every bite. The suggested amount of dried cranberries is ½ – 1 cup as they can be added to fit your preferences. As you mix, be cognizant of having an even distribution of the dry ingredients in the batter. Then, roll the batter into 1-inch balls in the palm of your hand and evenly place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Once placed in the oven, bake for 8-10 minutes, and then allow time for them to cool. Enjoy!

Image courtesy of Modern Honey

Categories
Mucho Gusto

Lilly’s Blackened Fish Tacos

This is the fiftieth installment in Mucho Gusto, a recipe initiative by and for students to help connect us through food in times of isolation. If you’ve got a recipe you think would make a great addition, reach out to us!

It is difficult not to derive a certain nostalgia from the last dish I made at home. Reminiscent of a fleeting moment, it whispers a reminder of summer’s finality. For me, it is a meal that is characterized not entirely by flavor, but by the company in the kitchen. A recipe rightly prepared in an organized symphony of the sizzling of fish and the mother-daughter banter over the adequate amount of sriracha. 

There is a distinct spirit of summer communicated through this dish. And so, I share this recipe with indescribable urgency as the influx of pumpkin spice begins to overwhelm the aisles of Trader Joe’s. It is in insistence to grasp the vanishing moment by your taste buds, to seize the peaches off of the shelves before it is too late. My recommendation is not to regard the calendar, but rather, to devour the last bite of August—even if it is already October.

Living on Cape Cod requires a tolerance for seafood. Ironically, I am a recent addition to the fish-eating crowd. What I’ve learned from each and every tourist-grab on the corner of this and that beach is the gravity of spices when it comes to preparation. Most of all, I can affirm—from personal experience—that wrapping seafood in a tortilla can persuade even the biggest fish skeptics.  

This fish taco recipe captures robust flavors in an impeccable pairing of textures. Blackened fish, peach salsa, and a drizzle of sriracha aioli compose an effortless unity of sweet, savory, and spicy that insists on your indulgence. 

Ingredients 

For Fish Tacos:

  • 1 1/2 lbs thick-cut fish (options include cod, halibut, mahi-mahi, or grouper)
  • 8 flour tortillas
  • Blackened seasoning (can be homemade or store-bought)
    • 3 teaspoons of smoked paprika
    • 1 teaspoon of onion powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon of sea salt
    • 1 teaspoon of garlic powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon of cumin
    • 1 teaspoon of chili pepper
    • 1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
    • 1 teaspoon of adobo seasoning
  • 1/2 cup shredded red cabbage 
  • 1 cup spinach leaves 
  • 1/4 cup scallion, chopped 
  • 1 cup small tomatoes, halved 
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

For Peach Salsa:

  • 1 ripe peach, peeled and diced
  • 1/4 cup onion, diced
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons jalapeño, finely minced
  • Salt to taste

For Sriracha Aioli:

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 to 1 fresh squeezed lime
  • 2 tablespoons of sriracha

Instructions:

In order to serve the fish hot off the stove, I recommend preparing the toppings first. To make the salsa, combine the peach, onion, jalapeño, cilantro, olive oil, and lime juice in a bowl. Mix the ingredients well and season to taste with salt. Then, cover and chill the salsa until ready to serve. Mango can also function as a substitute for the peach; its sweetness will also add balance to the spice of the jalapeño and sriracha aioli.

Next, place the shredded red cabbage, spinach leaves, scallions, and cherry tomatoes into small serving bowls to be set aside for additional toppings. For the sriracha aioli, mix the mayonnaise, lime juice, and sriracha together in a small bowl. The mayonnaise mellows the heat of the sriracha, and the amount you use can be adjusted to your spice preference. The lime adds flavor while liquifying the consistency of the thick mayonnaise, allowing the aioli to be lightly drizzled onto your taco. 

Cut your choice of fish into large, finger-length chunks to allow for more spice coverage, faster cooking, and an easier fit for the tacos. I prefer grouper, but any thick-cut fish, such as cod, halibut, or mahi-mahi will work. Once cut, generously coat all sides of the fish with the blackened seasoning and set aside. The spice blend can be easily store-bought or quickly-prepared in the combination of paprika, onion powder, sea salt, garlic powder, black pepper, cumin, chili pepper, cayenne pepper, and adobo seasoning. 

 In a large skillet, preferably cast iron, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat until hot. Lightly swirl the olive oil to evenly coat the bottom of the skillet. As the olive oil starts to sizzle, place the fish in the skillet, and cook each piece for approximately 3 minutes per side or until the fish is completely cooked and significantly charred on the edges. 

While the fish is cooking, heat the tortillas in a non-stick skillet until warm and browning on the edges. Take the tortillas and fish off of the stove and place them on separate serving platters. Allow your guests to create the tacos to their liking, adding the peach salsa, fresh-cut produce, and spicy aioli as toppings and enjoy!